Fishing Is A Hobby And An Art

Is fishing an art, a hobby, or sports? Regardless if it is a hobby or sport, there is indeed art in fishing. The equipment used in fishing (https://www.catskillflyfishing.org/gears/best-saltwater-spinning-reels/), the fishing rod alone is crafted skillfully by the hand which makes it part of an artistic endeavor.

Mastering the Art of Fishing

In terms of fishing, there is the art of fishing on wooden planks, the art of fly fishing, and others. Fishing even involves the thread dance which is among the main attractions of fishing.

The art of fishing on a wooden plank

Sri Lanka has a unique fishing method that is carried out on a small wooden platform. Anglers will sit on the wooden platform and wait for the fish to grab their bait.

The wooden stage was planted a few meters off the coast. The practice is believed to have begun during World War II, when local communities were short of food and the fishing grounds were crowded with people fishing.

At first, Sri Lankan sailors began fishing from overturned wrecks or crashed planes. But then some of them began to erect wooden platforms on coral reefs.

Fishing skills from generation to generation…

Fishing in the sense of catching fish has been known by human civilization since ancient times using primitive techniques which later developed into a more modern technique and is still used today. Likewise with the processing of fish catches, currently this method is still carried out with the same technique, for example, preserving fish by salt or by fumigation.

These skills have been passed on to at least two generations of fishermen who live along the 30 km coast which lies between the cities of Unawatuna and Weligama. Because the catch is too little, this practice is unlikely to last long, other than just as a tourist attraction.

The tsunami that occurred in 2004, which destroyed most of the Indian Ocean coastline, has changed the coastline of Sri Lanka and reduced the number of fish that came. Sailors will usually stop fishing completely during the annual rainy season.

 

National Gallery London Reveals Alastair Adams’ Oil Portrait of Tony Blair in a Post PM Pose

The National Gallery of London recently revealed a new oil portrait of Anthony Charles Lynton Blair, otherwise known as Tony Blair, former UK Prime Minister from 1997 to 2007.

The Gallery had commissioned Alastair Adams, the president and a highly reputed member of the Royal Society of Portrait Painters (RSPP), to complete a number of artworks featuring Tony Blair. The oil portrait the Gallery unveiled, will hang in the National Portrait Gallery, to form part of the house’s collection of portraits of all former British Prime Ministers.

Although former PM Blair’s photographs already hang in the National Gallery, including the Jonathan Yeo portrait displayed in the Great Hall of London, Alastair Adams’ Tony Blair oil painting is the first since the former PM resigned from office; aside from being the first Tony Blair painted portrait added to the museum’s National Portrait Gallery.

Alastair Adams Captured PM Blair’s Uncompromising Gaze as a World Leader

In a four by three feet oil painting, Alastair Adams presents a dramatic close-up of the former UK Prime Minister, who is best remembered for initiating various public sector reforms, negotiating the Northern Ireland Good Friday Agreement, as well as for UK’s highly controversial involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts.

Contemporary Curator of the National Portrait Gallery, Sarah Howgate, remarked that Mr. Blair’s direct gaze in the portrait is uncompromising; reflecting his commendable skill as an effective negotiator on the global stage. Ms. Howgate takes pride in commenting that

”The Gallery, through Alastair Adams’ skill as a Royal Portrait Painter, is now able to present Tony Blair by way of a portrait consonant with the personality of a person who has considerably shaped the political, cultural and economic climate of Great Britain”

At first, the former UK-PM notoriously refused to sit for a painting session after he stepped down from a position that only he, had occupied for the longest term in the history of British politics. In the spring of 2011 the Ex-Prime Minister eventually relented, and agreed to sit for Alastair Adams in his Buckinghamshire home; sans a tie and without his trademark mug of tea.

Finding Art Conservators

Simply speaking, art conservators are focused on preserving the past to be shown to our future generations. When dealing with priceless artworks that might be hundreds or even thousands of years old, it is vitally important that the person who will be working on it is knowledgeable and skilled. With this in mind, there are three major things that should be taken into account when looking for an art conservator.

Specialty in Arts

After all, you can’t just replace the history associated to an art when it is mishandled. It is not like you can buy from Firmagaver some accessories or whatnot to perform a quick fix. That is not how things work. So the question is, how you can find an art conservator and how a person becomes one?

First and foremost, a 4-year degree is required. This is especially from disciplines similar to the following:

  • Fine arts
  • Textile design
  • Anthropology
  • Science

On top of the degree requirements, art conservators are also expected to have broad knowledge of operations and best practices of museums. Hence, they are normally taking internship, consulting and/or apprenticeship at museums either after finishing school or when studying.

What Every Art Conservator should be

As mentioned before, there are couple of things that art conservators have to meet.

Experience – before entrusting any of your valuables to art conservator, among the major areas to be assessed is the breadth and depth of experience they have under their belt.

In most cases, art conservators gain their experience while in school or when they are taking internships at museums. Beyond this point, it is their personal journey by taking works for both governmental bodies or private institutions.

Niche Experience – art conservators are typically experts in certain niches. Especially in this regard, there are lots of niches where they could focused on like paper, metals, photographs, textiles and a lot more. When in search for a conservator, see to it that you pick one who is specializing in the specific kind of collection that you are at.

Passion – well perhaps, this should fall under the primary trait any conservator should have. Regardless, any really passionate art conservator must be taking methodical approach with their work. They must have genuine pleasure in caring, researching, preserving and unraveling mysteries behind the art they are working at.