Simply speaking, art conservators are focused on preserving the past to be shown to our future generations. When dealing with priceless artworks that might be hundreds or even thousands of years old, it is vitally important that the person who will be working on it is knowledgeable and skilled. With this in mind, there are three major things that should be taken into account when looking for an art conservator.

Specialty in Arts

After all, you can’t just replace the history associated to an art when it is mishandled. It is not like you can buy from Firmagaver some accessories or whatnot to perform a quick fix. That is not how things work. So the question is, how you can find an art conservator and how a person becomes one?

First and foremost, a 4-year degree is required. This is especially from disciplines similar to the following:

  • Fine arts
  • Textile design
  • Anthropology
  • Science

On top of the degree requirements, art conservators are also expected to have broad knowledge of operations and best practices of museums. Hence, they are normally taking internship, consulting and/or apprenticeship at museums either after finishing school or when studying.

What Every Art Conservator should be

As mentioned before, there are couple of things that art conservators have to meet.

Experience – before entrusting any of your valuables to art conservator, among the major areas to be assessed is the breadth and depth of experience they have under their belt.

In most cases, art conservators gain their experience while in school or when they are taking internships at museums. Beyond this point, it is their personal journey by taking works for both governmental bodies or private institutions.

Niche Experience – art conservators are typically experts in certain niches. Especially in this regard, there are lots of niches where they could focused on like paper, metals, photographs, textiles and a lot more. When in search for a conservator, see to it that you pick one who is specializing in the specific kind of collection that you are at.

Passion – well perhaps, this should fall under the primary trait any conservator should have. Regardless, any really passionate art conservator must be taking methodical approach with their work. They must have genuine pleasure in caring, researching, preserving and unraveling mysteries behind the art they are working at.