A Closer Look At Abstract Art

In this modern world where visual art is more likely represented in various forms and channels such as games like ROK (check their website), abstract painting has passed to be among those most preferred visual art by many art purchasers today.

Whether with acrylic paints, pastels or in oil: abstract painting is an integral part of the art. It is firmly anchored especially in modernity and many artists use this form of representation. But is it really a product of classical modernism, or are the beginnings of abstract art more ancient than many may have guessed?

What does an abstract painting mean exactly?

To devote yourself to this type of painting, you first have to understand what it means exactly. The term abstract art is not a specific epoch or a precisely defined style. Rather, it is a collective expression that combines non-object-related works and types of painting.

Abstract painting often appears in parallel in different currents. The categorization, whether abstract or not, is based on fundamental principles that have interpreted each art epoch differently in the past. These aim at organizing and/or composing with colors, shapes, and contrasts.

The most important thing, however, is that the artist has to completely detach himself from representational presentations. That is what makes abstract painting and that also means the Latin origin of the word abstract. If you keep this principle of abstract art in mind, you create your own abstract artwork.

Try it out and let your imagination run wild without orienting yourself on objects. As far as the choice of colors is concerned, you are just as free in abstract art. Whether you like to use acrylic paints or prefer to work with oil paints on canvas, anything is possible in the world of abstract painting. Also with a pen and a drawing pad you can create impressive non-representational images.

Abstract Art Origins

Many believe that abstract painting is a product of classic modernism. But it is actually the case that before 1910 and the beginning of the avant-garde the first abstract pictures were created by artists. As early as the 19th century, artists such as William Turner, the illustrator Victor Hugo and the symbolist Gustave Moreau painted non-object-related pictures and paintings.

These were often only made for study purposes in the studio and were never intended as exhibits. Most of these early abstract pictures are therefore drawings and the avant-garde movement declared these sketches to be art at the beginning of the 20th century.

The initial study paintings were now exhibited and were particularly popular in Europe around 1913. It spread rapidly, also in the different styles themselves. Each interpreted the abstract art differently, incorporated impulses from his own era and thus helped the abstract representation to develop ever further. This development from Expressionism, Cubism and the following styles continues to this day.

The abstract painting shows quite well how lively art and artistic development processes are and how today’s painters benefit from former artists and their work.