An Art Project About The Afterlife

Artist David Bade is leading a project in a former monastery in Maarssen. It is not a roofing project but it’s an art project about the afterlife. The visitors determine what life after death should look like.

Anyone who enters Buitenplaats Doornburgh unprepared in Maarssen does not immediately understand what is happening there. The former monastery is a modern building, at first glance it contrasts a bit poorly with the nearby old country estates along the Vecht. Inside the hallways, spaces, and even the flower garden, visitors of all ages and backgrounds are busy with paint, styrofoam, mesh, and wood.

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On March 30, 2019 David Bade started the ‘Project Hereafter’ here. On the basis of conversations with visitors and representatives of various religions, he imagines what life could look like after death. Only Bade is not the one who does the visible work, his employees of ‘Team Hereafter’ and interested parties from the outside do.

Team Hereafter

In the Chapter Hall, the former church space, Bade loosely welcomes the twenty participants of this workshop. He himself has a Protestant background, he says, but he is no longer practicing. At the request of the new administrators of the building, he is doing a project on the theme of Easter, the resurrection. That became the afterlife. Together with the public, of course, because that is Bade’s trademark.

Bade briefly explains the working method: anything is possible. There is a separate room for all major religions, where you can talk to believers. In each room there are also a few members of Bade’s ‘Team Hereafter’ working. You can come up with a proposal to make something yourself, or join current projects. And you can, in consultation, take stuff out of the reservoir.

In that reservoir, Bade has placed a number of works of art of his own that can be reused. Such as ‘It’s a long way coming home’, a painting with an angel at the bottom and a figure with a birdhouse as head, ‘also symbols of other worlds’. There are also images, colorful ‘assemblages’ of various objects. Bade: “This is called ‘cosiness has no time’, and it contains an heirloom, my parents’ clock. If you want to do something with it, please discuss it first. ” “Can we also add something to that painting?” Asks a woman. “Not with paint on the canvas,” Bade answers amused. “But it is possible to add a collage.” Eventually, he will piece together the pieces from all six rooms in this room to create a Gesamtkunstwerk.